Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry
The Honourable John McVeigh

LNP Cuts Through Red Tape

Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Minister John McVeigh has cut through the red tape, and announced new measures to make wild dog baiting cheaper and easier for graziers.

Mr McVeigh said graziers could not use livestock destroyed from their property, taking the meat to baiting stations where it will be injected with poison 1080.

“This is about cutting red tape. The requirement by the previous State Government for all baits to be of human food grade was ridiculous.”

“This is an important initiative for this government, and I am committed to implementing more workable solutions for graziers to destroy as many wild dogs as possible and help get our grazing industries back on their feet,” Mr McVeigh said.

Toowoomba North MP Trevor Watts said that eliminating the ridiculous regulations and red tape put into place by the previous Government was a positive step forward for the local community.

“Part of the 100 Day Action Plan we committed to Queensland was to do just this, to reduce unnecessary regulation by 20%,” Mr Watts said.

Safe Food Production Queensland is working closely with the Minister McVeigh and AgForce, together recognising the importance of managing the wild dog population.

Landholders can obtain bait from their Council, or use animals culled from their own property including cattle, horses, sheep, goats, camels and wild game.

Once the poison has been added to the meat, the landholder can take the baited meat back to their property for their own use, or use the bait in a collective baiting program across neighbouring properties.

There is a very clear distinction between the activities of baiting and commercial meat production and processing. The bait meat is clearly identified as containing 1080 so there is no risk of it being used for human consumption.

For more information contact your regional Queensland Wild Dog Offensive Group (QDOG) representative.